Could CBeebies be helping to produce a new generation of translators and interpreters?

The Lingo Show on CBeebies aims to teach pre-school children different languages through play.  The show’s featured languages are a reflection of the diverse languages spoken in local communities across the UK including Polish, Punjabi, Urdu and Somali.  The show also concentrates on languages taught in schools such as French, German, Spanish and Mandarin and introduced the Welsh language last month on St David’s Day.

Translation servicesChildren learn languages easily
Is it a myth or fact that children learn languages more easily than adults?  According to The Lingo Show children are very receptive to new sounds and happy to reproduce them.  The most effective way of learning a new language is when it is delivered frequently in small amounts in an engaging way.  Visual associations and games also help children to digest the new language too and this is what the show provides. 

Perhaps children find languages easier to learn than adults because they have not yet developed the self-consciousness that can affect adults when attempting to speak a new language?

Not for everyone?
Guardian columnist Zoe Williams recently wrote about her mother’s sceptical reaction and her 2 year old daughter’s reaction to The Lingo Show. 

When the show’s narrator asked the young viewers to say hello in Mandarin, “nee hao”, it was seen as a pointless exercise by Ms Williams’ mother because in her opinion her granddaughter could barely speak English as it was.  Ms Williams wrote that she protested this fact in her child’s defence only for the child to respond “Miaow” instead of “nee hao”!

Okay so maybe it will take some time for Ms Williams’ child to grasp Mandarin, but she did at least respond with a similar sound.  And surely being exposed to a language other than her mother tongue can’t be a bad thing.

Good exposure
Children being exposed to different languages through TV is a positive step and will hopefully aid their language education in school.  It will also assist interaction with peers whose mother tongue may not be the same as their own.

Parents need to keep up
However, parents need to stay on their toes if they don’t want to get left behind by their children in the language department.  The majority of parents will need to retrieve fragments of languages from their own school days or could perhaps benefit from watching The Lingo Show with their children.  After all it would be a shame if the children could only conduct conversations in Mandarin or other languages with inanimate objects such as the TV!  They’d be much more useful as translators or interpreters!

If you need translation help, get Enigma Translation on board now rather than waiting for your child to digest the next episode of The Lingo Show.  We are fluent in French, Spanish, German, Welsh, Mandarin, Polish, Punjabi, Urdu, Somali and many other languages – see our website for details.

Call us on +44 (0) 1604 750799, contact us via email or Facebook.

Polish translation

The Polish language belongs to the West Slavic languages and is the second most widely spoken Slavic language after Russian.  According to Wikipedia, 97% of Poland’s citizens declare Polish as their mother tongue.

Translation servicesThe most common dialects spoken are Greater Polish in the west, Lesser Polish in the south and southeast, Masovian in central and eastern parts and Silesian in the southwest.

Polish is also commonly spoken in Lithuania, Belarus and the Ukraine as well as by Polish emigrants and their descendants across the globe.


In Europe

It is also spoken in Hungary, Belgium, Kazakhstan, the Netherlands, Romania, Bulgaria, Sweden, United Kingdom, Norway, Estonia, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, France, the Faroe Islands, Russia, Serbia, Austria, Spain, Luxembourg, Andorra, Germany, Latvia, Denmark, Iceland, Italy, Greece, Finland, Ireland.

Globally
Further afield it is spoken in Azerbaijan, New Zealand, Uruguay, Mexico, Argentina, Israel, Australia, Brazil, South Africa, Peru and the United Arab Emirates.

In the United States there are more than 11 million Polish Americans with the biggest concentrations of population in New York, Illinois and New Jersey.  However the majority are not fluent in the Polish language even though it is often spoken at home.

In Canada, Toronto sees the highest concentration of Polish Canadians with 91,810 out of 242,885 speakers across Canada according to the 2006 census.

The Polish language
The Polish alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet with several additional letters.  Interestingly the letters q, v and x do not exist in the Polish alphabet and when encountered in foreign words known as loanwords, they are often replaced with kw, w and ks.  For instance quartz becomes ‘kwarc’, veranda becomes ‘weranda’ and extra becomes ‘ekstra’.

Cultural and geographical influences
Languages subtly change over the centuries due to cultural and geographical influences and borrow words from other languages which are adapted into the original language.  The Polish language is no exception and began its borrowing from Latin in the 9th century before progressing to Czech, German, Italian, Hungarian, French and Turkish throughout the following centuries.

For instance the Italian loanword pomodoro which translates as tomato in English, was adapted to ‘pomidor’ after Polish Queen Bona Sforza introduced Italian cuisine to Poland.  Turkish words from the 17th century which are still current today, include ‘jar’ translating as deep valley, ‘filizanka’ translating as cup and ‘arbuz’ translating as water melon.

Progression
The Polish language will continue to adapt along with all other languages and so will Enigma Translation.  We have professional translators who can translate from Polish to English and English to Polish with accuracy in many specialised areas and with expert knowledge.

Barclaycard International and Alstom Power are just two companies that confidently call on us for their Polish translation needs.  If you think you could benefit from our language expertise, why not get in touch on +44 (01604) 750 799, contact us via email, our website or on Facebook.